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Rhodiola for Performance, Chewable Beet Gum for the Mind, and an Update on Protein Timing

Rhodiola for Performance, Chewable Beet Gum for the Mind, and an Update on Protein Timing

Welcome to our weekly summary of the latest research updates from the world of sports nutrition. 

Train hard!

 

Can Taking Rhodiola Improve Your Athletic Performance? 


This review looked at whether taking Rhodiola rosea, a herbal supplement often used for mental performance, affects muscle health and physical performance. The researchers studied 263 people from 13 different studies. The results were mixed, but generally, taking Rhodiola rosea seemed to help with endurance and how hard people felt they were working during exercise. 

Our thoughts: Research shows some impact, but the results are inconsisten so far. We're keeping an eye on this interesting herbal product. If you have tried it, we would love to hear from you

Chewable Beet-based Supplement for Cognitive Function? 

beet chew supplements

 

Dietary nitrate, found in beetroot juice, has potential health benefits, but its impact on cognitive function is uncertain. In a study involving 44 participants, a single dose of a beetroot-based chewable supplement significantly improved memory consolidation and frontal lobe functions. While no changes were observed in certain cognitive aspects, the findings suggest that a beetroot supplement could enhance specific aspects of cognitive performance in healthy individuals.

Our thoughts: Beet juice is known for its impact on endurance performance, but cognitive function hasn't been proven yet. This is a step closer.   

 

Time to Re-think the Protein Timing Window?

 

This meta-analysis looked at the timing of protein supplement ingestion relative to training, to update current thinking. The researchers simply stated that protein after training or at night seemed to have the biggest impact. 

Our thoughts: We think the link between protein supplements and actual athletic performance is still hard to measure as most people eat a lot of protein in their diet anyway. Where taking supplements can adjust your protein production for a time after training, we're unconvinced that this has any tangible impact.